Your life is your symphony – you are its conductor.

You don’t get harmony when everyone sings the same note. Harmony is the ability of differences to be in tune.

“… pay attention to nature’s music… (you will) find that everything on… earth contribute(s) to its harmony.” ~ Hazrat Inayat Khan

Your life is your symphony – you are its conductor. The baton is in your hands!

About the Author of desirablelove.com:

AboutMe

New York University
MA · Aesthetics (study of the mind and emotions in relation to the sense of beauty/harmony)  Colloquium Title: “The Meta- and Physical Epistemology of Aesthetics: how the human body, mind & spirit are effected by beauty/harmony & love”

New York University
BA · Double Major: Psychology/Art History · Double Minor: Writing/Photography

I have lived and worked throughout the USA and Europe. Additionally, I traveled for roughly 3 years while living on a 72-foot sailboat. Lastly, I have had the opportunity to travel extensively throughout Western & Eastern Europe, Russia and Africa as well.

I attended christian primary and secondary schools. After what I had seen and experienced in the world, I had some problems with the concept of blind faith… While still in an Episcopal Prep School, I started searching for Universal Truths to answer questions (I felt Christianity was not). As a consequence, over the past 34 years I have researched, studied & practiced most major traditional (Western & Eastern) lifestyle philosophies & world religions. In the end, I found that the essence of all were actually one in the same. We truly are all One – all connected – all affecting ourselves as well as all those around us.

My life and education have afforded me a very unique (global) view of the world. Something I think is worth sharing:

I hope my blog helps you find health, happiness, harmony & through that a love & a wealth like you’ve never known!

Spiritual & Religious: The Case for Both

Oneness    Recently I mentioned “spirituality” to a friend, to which they sent me a post “Religious, Not Spiritual: The Case for Religion” (which you can read at the bottom of my post):

My simple response is:

I have been researching, studying & practicing all the major world (Western & Eastern) religions & lifestyle philosophies for 34 years (yes, I was sent to religious schools). I consider myself both religious & spiritual. I can define spirituality.

It is a belief in Oneness: that one cannot only have a belief in God/Universal Love on a conscious level (through doctrine/mankind’s interpretations), but that one can actually experience Him/Universal Love directly on a spiritual/nonphysical/energetic level.

If you study the ancient texts, beliefs and rituals of all the traditional major world (Western & Eastern) religions/lifestyle philosophies, you will find that in fact their essence is one in the same. They all ultimately serve and worship the one and only God/Universal Energy — they simply have different ways of describing/naming Him/It.

Since traditional religious/philosophical texts are simply man’s interpretation – they are imperfect. Therefore, only by studying (analyzing, practicing, comparing & contrasting over time) all of the world’s great (traditional) religions et al…. will a person find that one sacred text/tradition will actually answer the questions whose answers were lost in another interpretation. Ultimately giving a person a less biased & more global understanding of God/Universal Omnipotent Energy. Once you have this understanding, everything makes sense – which is truly a great comfort.

Many religions ask for blind faith at times, but if other traditions have the answer to the questions you seek… Why be blind? This is the 21st century – not Medieval times. Only together – as one – do they answer the questions of: How does a person Love unconditionally? How does someone find light in their darkest hour? How can humankind, not only believe in God’s Love, but actually tap into it & feel it? How can I find love & peace?

Of course, you are quite correct when you say many people use the word “spirituality” as a politically correct way to say “religion” these days. However, if that instigates conversations like these – I say, “That’s wonderful”. The more we discuss, the better chance the more people will learn & understand religion & spirituality.

In fact, the direct experience of spirituality might actually be the modern panacea for traditional religion. For once you have a direct experience, you have not doubts. With this in mind, you shouldn’t slam the door in the face of spirituality – you should embrace it.

If you are (Western) Christian, and have a hard time digesting the thought that people claim to be spiritual. I suggest you start by studying one or two of the Christian Mystics, such as Saint Teresa of Avila and/or Hildegard von (of) Bingen. All the great Christian mystics considered themselves religious and spiritual as well.

But remember: ‘The Himalayas of the soul are not for everyone.’ ~ Bhagavad Gita

~always with love

A Curious Faith

Don’t get me wrong. I am not some dogmatic crank trying to carve spirituality out of our religious lives. I’m just saying that “spirituality” (whatever that means) gets more than its share of attention today, while religion seems relegated to the scrap heap of history, certainly in popular American culture and among most (yes, most) of the people I associate with. It is not entirely clear what people mean today when they use the word “spiritual”, especially in the phrase “spiritual, not religious”. For our purposes today, let’s assume it means the private, subjective part of what we used to call religious experience, with “religion” being the public, shared part. I imagine that the audience for this blog is made up mainly of Presbyterians from the northeast who are, like me, in many ways sympathetic with the same forces of social liberalism that shun organized religion. So I think it…

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